About your Search

20130101
20130131
SHOW
Book TV 52
Today 43
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 237
FOXNEWSW 149
CSPAN2 120
CSPAN 118
CNNW 115
MSNBC 96
WRC (NBC) 83
FOXNEWS 69
CNN 62
WBAL (NBC) 62
WJLA (ABC) 59
KGO (ABC) 58
WTTG 57
WMAR (ABC) 56
WUSA (CBS) 46
KNTV (NBC) 43
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1798
Spanish 19
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,817 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the university of pennsylvania will -- pennsylvania. it's about 20 minutes. >> university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of her nation's history with the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organization and so on, and in the early decades of the 20 century that began to shift. the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and exercise clauses of the first amendment against the state, sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states for control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did indeed that the first amendment began, congress shall i not know love so it was addressed only to the national government. >> host: were there restrictions based on religion? >> guest: of cody if there were. several states had religion establishments.
. >> next, university of pennsylvania professor joseph turow talks to book tv about the daily u, which looks at the power of the advertising industry in the age of the internet. it's ten minutes. >> university of pennsylvania professor joseph turow is the author of "the daily you: how the new advertising industry is defining your identity and your worth." professor turow, who is nicholas mega honest at the. >> guest: a professor at at m.i.t. who came up with the idea of the daily me, and that is that we will all get newspapers conditioned to what we care about because we'll make the decisions about what is on the paper. the difference between that and the daily you is the notion that a lot of what goes on under the hood of the web is not conditioned by us. it's created as a result of a whole lot of activities by marketers we don't even see or know about, and we have a extrapolation in advertisings that almost anyone, except people in the advertising industry-doesn't know about. >> host: what does that mean? the last 20 years advertising has changed drastically with the rise of cable and the
're currently teaching law at the university o pennsylvania, and director of the university supreme court clinic. what's your practical experience with the law? sunny was a federal prosecutor in new york city and i saw every kind of case. i saw people who were sorry for what they'd done and wanted a chance to make amends and the system didn't do anything to encourage it. i saw people angry and in denial and the system didn't confront them or make them fess up to what they'd done. i saw a lot of good well can meaning lawyers and professions who took it for granted ited a to be an assembly line but the defendants and jurors and victims were frustrated that they weren't listened to. >> host: how often were you approached for a plea bargain? >> guest: in every case. out of 100 cases, there were three jury trials and one person trial in a year, which -- one bh trial in a year which is typical. we can't do away with that system but at sentencing we can allow people to talk and focus on working and making restitution and apologizing. >> host: did you ever suggest that as a prosecutor. >> i did. the peo
on a wireless device very easily. >> you are watching booktv. now, amy gutmann come university of pennsylvania talk to the tv about her latest book, "the spirit of compromise." she talked about her role as president at the university. this interview recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia as part of booktv is college series and is about 20 minutes. >> you are watching booktv on c-span 2 and one of the things we like to do is visit college campuses. we contact you professors also authors and showcase books that she may not know about otherwise. we are pleased to be at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia this week and were joined by the president of the university, amy gutmann. she's the author of this book, "the spirit of compromise: why governing demands it and campaigning undermines it." president gutmann, are we a politically compromised? >> guest: we were created in compromise. a lot of people think of the revolutionary war, which separated us from our mother country. but if you recall -- i know you weren't there then, but if you recall historically speaking ou
's message? and wheel ask pennsylvania governor comcore bet, we'll find out why people from virginia to maryland to new jersey are moving to his state and what will lance armstrong's doping admissions cost him. the lawsuits are already piling up. and possible criminal prosecution. but here is another question. could armstrong go to jail? the kudlow report begins right now. >> here is my quick take on his debt ceiling stand off. do not mess with the credit rating with the united states of america. however, you can race the debt ceiling and cut spending at the same time. on top of that, you kcan fix th $2 trillion situation. that is my take. charlie wrangle from new york and i begin with you. i don't understand why that can't be done. you can get that done. you are one of my buddies, but i object to you using the default. you have enough cash flow and the vast majority. i hate that argument. i know. but it is wrong to call it default. >> why not avoid default all together. because i believe it distorts the rest of the debate the good congressman and i need to have. >> cutti inting spen
.. >> next, booktv interviewed the university of pennsylvania's richard gelles about his book "the third lie." in the book professor gelles argues that the vast majority of government social programs don't work and suggests a different approach. this is about ten minutes. gls well, booktv is on the road. we're in philadelphia at the university of pennsylvania, and we're interviewing some professors who also happen to be authors. and we want to introduce you to the dean of the university of pennsylvania's school of social policy and practice. this is richard gelles on your screen. and one of his books, his most recent, is called "the third lie: why government programs don't work and a blue print for change." dr. gelles, i'm here from the government, and i'm here to help you. is that not true? >> guest: not true. >> host: why not? >> guest: because most government social programs which are designed to help people don't actually help. in some instances it is little more than the, i hate saying this, but the do-gooder full employment act. it provides lots of jobs for people who'd like
pennsylvania to convince locals to lease their farmland. however, he ends up sympathizing with them who value their land. here's a clip. >> i grew up in a large agricultural committee. tractor pulls, cow tipping. the whole farming town fantasy was just shattered. >> i am happy to announce we will be bringing natural gas to mckinley. >> cannot believe this is right outside the city. it looks like kentucky. >> are you the owner of this place? >> no. >> how come you are doing all the work? >> you signed this lease. >> there is no reason that your town should not have a state of the art high school. >> that was a clip of the trailer from the new film "promised land." the controversial use of fracking behind the natural gas boom has met with stiff resistance in new york state, where there has been a moratorium against the process. that moratorium can soon expire. new york governor andrew cuomo has until february 27 to make a decision. he has previously promised not to lift the moratorium until research proves it can be done safely. thousand -- thousands are expected to protest next wednesday at hi
? >> madison and pennsylvania avenue. this crowd has been waiting for this because you know the announcer, charlie brattman, he is an institution here. i would like to say, he is spitting enthusiasm. he doesn't have that broadcaster's voice that some people might think but you can hear how excited he felts about this. he's been doing it for years. he's been telling them for last hour, we're getting ready, folks, he's almost here. and broadcasting, that's what we like to call a deep tease. so these folks have been ready and waiting for some time. as we're waiting to see the president come by. i was talking to you earlier about the five branches of the military standing here. they've been standing here since 9:00 this morning. in kind of an informal relaxed pose. but once some of the bands started coming through and the color guard, that immediately changed. we saw them saluting. and they're now in, you know, a very rigid format as they're supposed to be. getting ready to salute again as they wait for the president to come. again, these are folks that are here strictly to honor the presiden
pennsylvania newspaper that has an article that starts off with letters from boston complained the taste of their fish being altered number which would suggest a humorous take on the boston tea party. what you'll find most commonly is the extract of a letter to lead into the article said today. you also note there weren't headlines. headlines were very common in the 18th century, so most articles that bad belief that the extract of a letter or a dateline. another primary news source with the exchange system or other newspapers. so once they print their weekly edition, based send issues to the other colonial printers who in turn reprint extracts from that addition and around, often under a data line. this is also a boston gazette issue from 1766. so you do chang or 60 of mine tells me this news came from new york and quite rightly the new york newspaper. after action reports are primary source of news once the war begins. so after action reports that when the commanding officer would read a summary of the events of the military engagement and some not at the chain. often an america that w
at the university of pennsylvania. he's the author most recently of this book, racial paranoia, the unintended consequences of political correctness. dr. jackson, when you talk about racial paranoia, who is paranoid? >> guest: i would argue we are all paranoid when it comes to race and probably for good reason. one of the points in the book is that raises a category itself is about the embedding of paranoia into the way they look a social life. for instance, the whole point is to say some distances are so paramount, biological, hardwired that we have to be on the lookout at all times and mixing of different ways in which we differentiate between us and them. greece itself is about fearing social paranoia. when you think about a country like the united states that's trying to work through its own history of racial antagonist and coming to have two models. one is we're transcending them in moving beyond, trying to build a multiracial community. .. the only reason why i feel like we have to be very careful about serious discussions about things we feel uncomfortable about. we've been through all
. they will head down pennsylvania avenue that parallels the national mall. there is a big turn when the motorcade is at the treasury building. there is word that is where the first and first lady may leave the limousine and walk the final stretch to the white house. it will cap off a day of celebrations in washington, dc including the ceremonial swearing in of the president for four more years in the white house. >> i will to the best of my ability, preserve and protect and defend the constitution of the united states, so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. [ applause ] >> president obama took the oath on a stack of bibles one used in abraham lincoln's inauguration another belonging to dr. martin luther king jr. who we honor today. the president referenced the slain civil rights leader prominently in the remarks. he took on gay rights and immigration and entitlements and the deep political divide across our nation. first to the parade route. john roberts will travel with the parade along pennsylvania avenue if the technical gods allow it. john, good afternoon. >> so far the gods are w
of the university of pennsylvania talked to book tv about her latest book "the spirit of compromise." she also talked about her role as the president of the university. this interview recorded at the university of pennsylvania and philadelphia is part of booktv's college series, and it's about 20 minutes. >> you are watching book tv on c-span2, and one of the things we like to do one book tv is visit college campuses. we can talk to professors who are also authors showcasing books that you may not know about otherwise. we are pleased to be at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia this week and we are joined by the president of the university, amy gutmann coming and she is the call author of this book, "the spirit of compromise why government demands it and campaigning underlines it." president gutmann come are we a politically compromising nation? >> we were created in compromise. a lot of people think of the revolutionary war, which separated us from our mother country, but if you recall -- i know you weren't there then, what if you recall his slickly speaking, the founding fathers c
. this looks good. pennsylvania abbott don't, 14th street d.c. 295 looking fine. inbound suitland parkway near silver hill road, minor accident. there's an accident before new braddock road, near 66, off to the shoulder. on the beltway looking good at the american legion bridge. no trouble report on the entire beltway. traveling are open out of kensington,, connecticut avenue, and then getting through town. looks pretty good. back to you. >> thank you. there's a new facebook feature for your phone and it's free. >> could misspelled words protect your computer? paula faris has more. >> facebook introduces 3 cell phone calling for the iphone. if you download the app you can make charges free of charge -- you can make calls for a start 21 also has the app. at&t is now making face time widely available on its alternatcellular network. temple run video game took 12 hours on thursday to give the no. 1 spot on the free apps list. could being a bad speller make you safer? computer users whose passwords contain misspelled words or poor grammar are less likely to have their accounts hacked. >> here is
minutes. >> well, book tv is on the road. we're in philadelphia at the university of pennsylvania, and we're interview something professors. who also happen to be authors. we want to introduce you to the dean of the university of pennsylvania school of social policy and practice, this is richard gelles on your screen one of his books, his most recent, is called: "the third lie: why government programs don't work and a blueprint for change." dr. gelless, i'm here from the government and i'm here to help you true? >> guest: not true. >> host: why? >> guest: they don't tallly help in some instances it's little more than -- i hate to say that's -- the good-gooddedder employment act, lots of people would like to help, but if you look at whether the needle has moved and'em have been helped by substantial amounts of government programs and money, the bottom line is very rarely are people helped. and i thought that it was a story worth telling. the idea came to me as i was being smuggled into the back door of the state house in the state of hawai'i for a meeting with the secretary, the speaker
early 1774, pennsylvania newspaper that has an article that starts off with letter from boston complain about the fish being altered which suggested a humorous take on the boston tea party. what you will find most commonly is an extract from the letter to lead in to the articles of the day. we note there weren't headlines weren't common in the 18th century. most of the articles lead with the extract from a letter or a dateline. another primary news source is -- once they would print the weekly edition they would send issues up-and-down the colonies that would print off other ones. this it new york january 6, boston gazette issue. here the new york 6 january dateline tells know came from new york and qiek likely the new york newspaper. there is a primary source of news once the war begins. so the reports are when the commanding office would write a summary of the event of the military engagement they were in the battle and send that up the chain. often in america that would be the president of congress. the president of congress would share that report with the local newspaper printer. t
of batter up -- but rather about education. the signs you see right here on pennsylvania avenue and 14th street. >> people call it america's main street but it is my main way of coming to work every day. >> a new law bans drivers from making new turns in bike lanes. >> he is glad to see there is an effort to educate drivers on the new law. >> it is a big thing for me and my family. >> police officers and volunteers were handing out fliers informing drivers of the new rules. that shows pennsylvania avenue. >> we have had several crashes here and we want to make sure we don't have any more crashes. >> there's 16 bicycle related crashes on pennsylvania avenue. 11 recalled by drivers making a u-turn. education is a good way to start changing the mind of drivers. >> this time he got away with a warning. >> once they start cracking down drivers will be looking at fines of up to $100 each. >> still to come facebook has released a better than expected earnings report. >> here is a live look outside right now as storms moved into the area. >> facebook performed better than expected in the fourth
. professor happ was interviewed at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. part of book tv's college series. >> host: university of pennsylvania history professor, stephen hahn is the author of this book "the political world of slavery and freedom." professor hahn, before we get into the subject of the book, what's the image on the front cover? >> guest: that's a very good question and the answer is i have no idea. the editor proposed -- thought it was a very eye-catching image and when i showed it to friends and colleagues they had no idea what it meant. it doesn't clearly relate to anything in the book but i think they were interested in selling books, and that's how they chose it. i think it is a really interesting photograph, and i think it speaks to sort of complex connections within african-american communities that involve gender as well as power. but beyond that, i don't know. >> host: well, professor hahn, what do going to the topic of the book -- what do we know wrongly about slavery in the u.s.? >> guest: well, one of the issues that i try to deal with in the book is the p
at a gun store in pennsylvania led police on a pursuit and the recovery of more than two dozen stolen guns in baltimore city. >> the suspects are accused of robbing a gun store in pennsylvania and driving the gun here in baltimore investigators recovered 29 handguns from the suspects' car is. the video shows a car running -- ramming into a store early monday morning. at one point you see a man running through the store. the suspect took office 29 handguns. the two drove to baltimore police spotted the car in -- around 4:00 tuesday morning. >> this set of surveillance on the vehicle -- and they set up surveillance on the vehicle. >> the suspect crashed and had to be cut out of the vehicle and transported to shock trauma with critical injuries. under the driver's seat was a loaded firearm. and in the rear, a duffel bag contained 27 additional firearms. if we have not done this could work, these guns would have resulted in taking young lives on the streets of baltimore. but we have taken them off. >> the two men are been treated for injuries at shock trauma. are told they are in serious condi
. she was hurt while ringing in the new year with her family. she was visiting from pennsylvania. this happened. linda so is here this morning to tell us how badly was she injured. >> reporter: at last check it is very serious. she was in critical condition on life support. it happened as the clock struck midnight on new year's eve. witnesses reported hearing gunshots mixed in with fireworks. investigators believe a bullet went into the air and came back down hitting the girl in the head. the 10-year-old girl from pennsylvania collapsed minutes after midnight. it happened on aj -- ajs court. sheriff deputies are trying to figure out how far away the shooter was from the girl. investigators spent new year's day canvassing the neighborhood hoping to find more evidence. at this point they don't think the bullet came from a family member. neighbors say they heard gunshots fired when fireworks went off. >> firearms for celebratory reasons is not safe. this is a unique example, but this is against the law. so something that people shouldn't do. >> reporter: now investigators with the c
at the university of pennsylvania annenberg school of communication. .. is. >> i argue when you think about a country like united states trying to work after its own history of racial antagonism, 1 mile is we transcend to build a multiracial community but posters reality by oppression hopefully we will move beyond it. but they both fall under that umbrella. >> host: go to the second example of a ignoring race. why it's important? >> it is important not to make a fetish but not to discuss it means it is already in the room but we have to be careful that is the historical position we have been through this but now to move forward to pretend we have not run this are already? to know what we want the community to become the look of the differences that divide us. it is a fine ninth to make too much or make a fetish are everyone could have a vested interest. >> host: professor jackson what is the role of political correctness? at. >> guest: it is easy to take the pot shot but it tries to place a premium on its ability. we don't want to offend our make them feel uncomfortable but when that is con
inauguration studio high atop the canadian embassy overlooking pennsylvania avenue here in northwest washington. it's spectacular vantage point to bring you all the significant events thatter we are going to be witnessing today. >> the front row to the capitol. >> absolutely. i want to start by saying thanks to the folk here at the canadian embassy. we'll tell you more about how hoe helpful they've been but we do appreciate their hospitality this morning. >> for those of you up right now and getting ready to head down to the capitol, we are helping you do just that. we'll get an update on metro for you in just a moment. first, the question that you really need to pay attention to, how should you dress in you are going to be down here today. turn isack in the studio now with a look at that. you can definitely feel the breeze behind us t -- it feels all of 30 degrees today. >> moi suggestion is everybody dress like you. you look great today. >> layers. >> lots of layers this morning. we'll be on the chilly side particularly early. once the sun gets up, we should top out in the mid-40s. reagan na
the school tens of millions unless the governor of pennsylvania gets his way and why he says he is suing to overtown the punishment facing overtown the punishment facing penn state after the scandal.ye. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo, buddy! i got this. gimme one, gimme one, gimme one! the wer of the "name your price" tool. only from progressive. >>gregg: the governor of pennsylvania is accusing the ncaa of illegally penalizing penn state over the sex abuse scandal fining the university $60 million after an independent report found top officials ignored abuse allegations against the football coach jerry sandusky who now is in prison after a jury convicted him of sexually abusing ten young boys. in some cases the abuse happened on the penn state campus. but the governor of pennsylvania says the fine and other punishments like a bowl ban and the deletion of wins from 1998 to 2011, punish the wrong people. >> these sanction
pennsylvania newspaper that has an article that starts off with letters from boston containing -- complaining the taste of their fish being altered which would suggest a humorous take on the boston tea party. what you will find most commonly is the extract of a letter from the articles of the day. you will also note their warrant headlines. the headlines weren't very common in 18th century and so most of the articles back then would lead with extract of a letter or a dateline. another primary news source was the exchanges. there were other newspapers so once the colonial printer would print their weekly additions they would send issues up and down the continents to the colonial printers who would in turn reprint extracts from that edition in their own often under dateline. new york january 6, this is a boston gazette issue from 1756, so here the new york dateline tells me this news came from new york and place likely in the new york newspaper. after action reports are also a primary source of news once the war begins. so after action reports or when the commanding officer would write a summar
years in a pennsylvania mental hospital, emmanuel nzambi was able to buy a gun in that state. he used it to kill mary moola. brian perry was nzambi's attorney. >> any person who has been involuntarily committed to an in-patient mental health facility should not have the tiebility purchase a handed gun period. >> reporter: perry believes the shooting could have been prevented if pennsylvania had reported nzambi's name to the federal database established by law in 1998. >> he's a perfect example of somebody who slipped through the cracks. >> reporter: for the past 15 years, the state of pennsylvania collected the names of seriously mentally ill residents but never sent that information to the federal government. just this month, though, the state police sent 642,000 such names to the f.b.i. >> it protects pennsylvanians, and it also protects people from other state. >> reporter: pennsylvania attorney general kathleen kane said states need clearer guidelines on who should be on the list. >> we all have different definitions of mental illness and we need to get those all on the same track
's parade route. when he leaves the capitol and heads up pennsylvania avenue, he's actually going to be going between tens of thousands of citizens, and in some sections he'll even be out and walking. guarding that distance takes a lot of bodies. that's why there will be about 10,000 active duty and national guard troops here to help the secret service. in addition to that, there will be about 8,000 police officers from all sorts of agencies, including nearby states, the national park service, things like that, and they'll be doing many duties. there will be planes flying around to protect the air space. there will be boats on the river. there will be people on bike patrol, people with dogs looking for anything they can find. chemical threats, physical threats, disturbances in the crowd. it's a huge job and the demands are immense simply because, if you think about it this way, even if half as many people showed up as last time, that's still a million people in the heart of d.c. >> tom forman, thanks very much. >>> the president and first lady and first family are getting ready to
of pennsylvania talked to book tv about her latest book "the spirit of compromise. she also talked about her role as president of the university. this interview recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia is part of book tv college series and it's about 20 minutes. >>> you are watching book tv on c-span2 and one of the things we like to do is visit college campuses. we can talk to professors' letter authors and showcase books that he might not know about otherwise. we are pleased to be at the university of pennsylvania philadelphia joined by the president of the university, amy gutmann and she is the co-author of this book "the spirit of compromise with government demands it and campaigning undermines it." president gutmann are we a completely compromising nation? >> we were created in compromise. a lot of people think of the revolutionary war which separate us from our mother country but if you recall historically speaking the founding fathers crafted a compromise that created the constitution, they were as polarized as any set of americans had been throughout the country in histo
. across central pennsylvania, pennsylvania turn like will be dealing with some of the snowy conditions from last night. that is beginning to taper off. treacherous driving this morning. now yesterday we had the ice in mississippi. it's now warmer there. slowly improving. overnight we had a little ice in tennessee. temperatures warmed up now. so we're not so much dealing with too many problems in areas around nashville and also into louisville and lexington. much of west virginia is warming up. they're mostly dealing with rain. travel on the east coast today, the airports will be a mess in all areas of the northeast today, especially new york city up into boston. philadelphia airports dealing with rain. a lot of rain later today especially in areas of georgia. some rain will push into virginia and washington, d.c., and baltimore and maryland areas. as far as the total accumulations go with this storm, we're mostly looking at a three to five inch event across new england. south coast of new england will be dealing mostly with sleet and mixing in with a little snow. only zero to an inch.
in an interview recorded at the university of pennsylvania at philadelphia mary francis berry shares her stories about serving on the united states commission on civil rights. set ultimate by president eisenhower in 1957. this is about a half an hour. >>> on your screen now on booktv is a well known face for c-span viewers. that's mary francis berry. professor at the university of pennsylvania. she's also the author of several books. at the university of pennsylvania today to talk to her about this book. "and justice for all." "and justice for all: the united states commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america" mary francis berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission begin and why? >> well, it started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with secretary of state about the way the united states was seen around the world because a lot of the racism that was going on that people would hear about and read about. and the fact that there seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening whether it was lynching or some kind of discrimination that
. hundreds of thousands of people are expected to watch the parade go down pennsylvania avenue. people began making the floats even before the election. president and first lady will attend two inaugural balls. the president and vice president will participate in a prayer service at the national cathedral here in d.c. i'm hallie jackson reporting. >> 6:06. some mental health experts call today the most depressing day of the year. >> barbara walters is waking up in a hospital this morning after a weekend fall. >> we are taking a look at the roads. we will let you ." >> welcome back. 33 degrees downtown. things are settling down in baltimore after a big night last night. it will be a chilly day today. not as warm as it was yesterday. we were in the lower 60's yesterday. a transition day into the arctic air that is moving in. a high thin cloud cover. will show to the radar -- we will show you the radar. a clipper storm will come through this evening and overnight. it will give us the possibility of some snow showers and flurries. that is happening in western pennsylvania and back into western m
pennsylvania. garrett county will pick up around 4-5 inches. maybe snow flurries around the baltimore. you can see this arctic air waiting in the wings. temperatures about 30 below zero. that arctic air is waiting to move into the mid atlantic region. we will see daytime highs in the 20's. 26 degrees in jarrettsville. a mixture of sun and clouds. maybe some snow showers later this afternoon or this evening. high temperature between 37 and 42 degrees. it will turn windy and cold for the next of the week. the wind chills will be in the teens. there could be some snow by friday. back into the 20's by the weekend. >> ravens fans showing no signs of it this morning but some consider today the most depressing day of the year. many have dubbed the third monday in january as blue monday. what better way to cure those blues than by shopping? only 9% say they feel guilty about their choice of therapy. you may see ads that claim to turnaround your credit score. be careful about believing some of those promises. >> it is a pile of broken dreams from people trying to turn around their financial history. >>
to this and operation. >> i am gloria, from seattle. >> michelle, new york. >> marion, pennsylvania. >> you decided to meet here. >> we are all three sisters. >> why did you decide to come to washington for the 57 and operation? >> i think we regretted not being here quarter years ago. we decided we would not miss it this time around. >> we never thought about it or we did not think it is possible to come altogether. >> how did this all happened? how did each of you get here? >> i drove up from pennsylvania. >> i flew in. >> gives me an average cost of how much this will come to, the bill to be here in washington and to stay overnight. >> probably over $2,000. hotel're able to find a and do all that. what are the logistics like? >> we rented a condo from somebody advertising. >> what time did you get up to make your way down here? >> 5:00 a.m. the last couple of days, a lot of walking. >> give me your impressions. your dancing before the camera came out. >> hit the excitement is in the air. we cannot get enough of it. it is awesome. >> do you has volunteered for the president? >> no, just donations
. >> the sand duskky case is back in the news. why the go of pennsylvania is suing the ncaa. >>> and and receive paulson will be up with the forecast. ñsxóxgñ >>> some lawmakers are furious with their colleagues for not following through on a schedule vote for relief for victims of hurricane sandy. the senate approved $60 billion in aid but some house republicans argue the package is excessive. in a statement today, chris christie said that sandy victims deserve better than the "selfishness and duplicity on display in congress last night." >> americans are tired of the palace intrigue political p partisan ship -- political party signship ." >> house leaders are set to meet with john boehner to demand a vote today before a new congress is sworn in. >>> and brand-new congressman eric swawell is gearing up for his new job. he represents the 15th congress's district. he was alameda county's district attorney before he unseated pete stark in the november election. he says he can be impatient at times but knows how to harness that to get the job done. >> i'm gonna go back there and work in washingt
's program, president obama is not the only one marching down pennsylvania avenue for the second time. we have more on the bands. among the challenges in the second term of barack obama will be dealing with the situation in syria. a series of missiles have arrived to help against syria. this is an attempt to keep violence from spilling over. >> late last year, turkey asked nato for a missile defense system. the pieces of that system came off of the boat from germany. >> the military equipment is now in turkey and not far from the border in syria and the organization insists that the hardware stays in this country. nato says that they are not crossing the border to get directly involved in the conflict in syria. -- >> germany and the u.s. have agreed to send patriot missiles to germany. -- >> our mission is to protect the town, are ranged between nato and the turkish allies, so i don't see any involvement in any offensive action, that is not what we're here for. >> turkey insists that they can handle the rest of their defense. the war is just on the other side of the fence. the patriots wi
of pennsylvania into the northeast as we go throughout the day. it's critical, the temperatures. notice we're fine cleveland, detroit. chicago, you're fine, above freezing. this is the freezing line. snakes down just north of d.c. so anywhere from pennsylvania to new jersey to southern new england, you're the ones we're concerned with as this heads east. white is snow. pink is freezing rain and sleet. green is the rain. you notice you start with snow, then we go to freezing rain and sleet. then over to rain. the worst of it right now heading across pennsylvania. a good burst of snow near altoona now, then it will change to freezing rain. again, that's starting to creep in on the greater washington d.c./baltimore area. the forecast, beginning as snow and turning to freezing rain outside of new york city, philly, southern new england. we'll talk more about the national forecast, but first here's a look outside your window. a messy day in philadelphia, but you will end up late in the day with temperatures above freezing. getting hold from school or work, much of new jersey, philadelphia, new york cit
to stop illegal u-turns on pennsylvania avenue in northwest. u-turns are illegal on pennsylvania from 3rd to 15th streets because of the bike lanes which run down the center of the road. 11 out of the 14 bicycle crashes in 2010 and 2011 along the pennsylvania avenue corridor involve illegal u- turns. so yesterday officers spent some time handing out flyers to educate drivers about the laws and also cited drivers who made illegal turns. back to you, mike and jess. >> thanks, monika. >>> 4:50. a look at health news. we begin with new information about the 2010 meningitis outbreak. maryland health officials say when they learned of a potential link between a spinal steroid injection in cases of fungal meningitis, they waited nearly a week before they alerted the public. officials delayed notifying the entire state in order to gather as much information as possible. he said the delay posed no harm to the public since the state immediately alerted the clgs which were administration -- clinics which were administering the shots and they stopped using them. >>> a study released yesterday debunke
, but crews blocked off pennsylvania avenue this morning to get ready for the inaugural parade. vice president joe biden took his official oath of office from supreme court justice sonia sotomayor at the naval observatory. soon after that he and the president laid a wreath at arlington national cemetery, and then at noon in the white house president obama received the official oath of office from chief justice john roberts, which the constitution requires on january 20th. we have team coverage of this inauguration sunday. darcy spencer is downtown where metro has seen double the typical sunday ridership. storm team 4 meteorologist chuck bell tracking the inauguration day forecast. we start with chris gordon live on capitol hill. a lot of excitement in the air around d.c. today, chris. >> reporter: good evening. you could see at this hour on the mall people are milling about. it's a beautiful evening and the people are very friendly and excited down here. crowds, traffic growing. tomorrow the focus of the world will be on the u.s. capitol for the inauguration, and today some of the people parti
. >> he brought the lawsuit against ncaa. >> bill: the governor of pennsylvania on behalf of the people of pennsylvania. the people of pennsylvania are the ones paying it penn state is a public institution. >> future students. >> bill: bill i'm protecting you pennsylvanians i'm going to sue the ncaa because they had no right to levy. is he going to win that? >> he is going to lose the lawsuit. >> bill: racking up even more money to the taxpayer in the process, right? >> it makes him look good do you think is he a phony on the board' university. the university agrees to this. they had to agree. >> maybe he he rethought it you can rethink. >> the research the antitrust laws. is that it. >> six months of this? this all happened in july. >> the governor of pennsylvania is a phony. >> here we go again. 2013. >> but we're saying going to lose -- >> i don't think so. >> sounded that way to me. everybody says yes. >> dial it back. >> bill: i wouldn't be on the pennsylvania turnpike any time soon, ladies. >> game over. no you might have to go upstate new york right into ohio and go around the co
republicans from new york and new jersey, 13 from pennsylvania, 20 from the west coast, 44 from the midwest. within that group of 89 are the votes that you're going to need to pass assault weapons ban, bans on big magazines, tightening up the background checks. and i think that's very possible. and i think the sandy vote tonight really tells us something. john boehner allowed this to pass, even though most republicans voted against it. 49 republicans voted for it. i bet you in those 49 are the votes you're going to need for meaningful gun control. and so a lot will be up to john boehner. will he let republicans who are like the republicans in new york who voted for this vote the views of their constituents or will he impose the views of come up for a vote? >> what do you think the white house's assessment is of that what you just laid out? what do you expect from president obama tomorrow in terms of a balance between things he can do himself and things he would need congress to do? >> well, he is going to do as much as he can to enforce existing law and do things through executive orders. n
's a human being. all right. now, in pennsylvania, university of pennsylvania professor brutally murders his wife dr. rafael brutally murdered wife. found blowjenned bludgeoned to death. murder alleged by the prosecution did not want to pay the $4,000 of spousal support that was awarded her. she was planning on moving out. getting her own apartment. she had already rented one. when this happened. he was able to strike a plea deal with the prosecutors and the state to plead to a voluntary manslaughter which carries a range up to 20 years and you the guidelines he received a range between 5 to 10 years. eligible for parole. he was denied twice and is he back up now. >> now is he going to get parole after five years. >> january 28th. >> let me tell the audience, this man, this professor at university of pennsylvania went to ivy league school. took a crowbar, a crowbar so voluntary manslaughter. he volunteered i don't understand why this was pled down voluntary manslaughter. >> right. he killed his wife with a crowbar. why are you pleaing it down? >> the prosecutor said well, it was a rage crime
pennsylvania that regularly vote democratic. so some kwauk thougquack thaugo to give the rural votes more power. their decided to kill the power of how the real state goes overall. if they can't get people to vote for them, they try to kill the power of those who don't. will they get away with it? not if you stay tuned and keep an eye on these little buggers. they've got their mickey mouse ears on. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, chris. and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, president obama won. this president has no time to waste and he's using it to push for change on gun control, on immigration, on climate change, on ending the ban on women serving in combat. he's got a full agenda. and it was on full display today. remember all of that bluster from governor romney about undoing wall street reform, letting consumers fend for themselves? yeah, not going to happen. today, the president nominated hits to both the sec and the consumer protection bureau. the message? we're moving forward. anyone guess where we'll be if the other side were in charge? >> wh
outrage involving penn state. the governor of pennsylvania has decided that the real victims of jerry sandusky were not the children that were raped and abused and raped but the penn state football program itself. he's filed a lawsuit against the ncaa seeking to reverse those sanctions and exonerate the school. >>> finally, only one of the following four things are less popular than congress. meth labs, nfl replacement refs, used car salesmen, and root canals. that's next. this is "hardball," the place for politics. ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> the author of perhaps the definitive book on american politics has died. richard ben cramer wrote "what it takes," a thousand-plus page book about the 1988 presidential election. the book chronicled the personalities and idiosyncrasies of candidates like bob dole, mike dukakis, and george herbert walker bush. nbc first read calls i
joining us, nick army. and the latest outrage involving penn state. the governor of pennsylvania has decided that the real victims of jerry san duchy were not the children that were raped and abused and raped but the penn state football program itself. he's filed a lawsuit against the ncaa seeking to reverse those sanctions and exonerate the school. >>> finally, only one of the following four things are less popular than congress. meth labs, nfl replacement labs, and root canals. well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. th
to the jaunty walks along pennsylvania avenue by barack and michelle and the wild and woolly greetings of vice president joe biden. we're all part of this. they were shouting we're in this together and we're going to act together and we're going to try to open dialogue with those who would be our enemies abroad. we're not looking for another war this time and under this president we're looking for a way to avoid one. because these wars as we've all learned the hard way are a lot easier to start than to finish. let's start with this astounding presidential embrace of the ongoing american revolution from lexington and concord to seneca falls, selma, and stonewall. sam stein covers politics for "the huffington post," and stephanie schriock is president of emily's list. let's start with the message of inclusion and community in the president's address yesterday. many have noticed his preference for three iconic places with historic significance in the fight for american rights. let me run through them. first, seneca falls, new york, where in 1848 elizabeth cady stanton and others led a historic co
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,817 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)